Today’s Top Stories | Christmas Stories from History!

Today’s Top Stories | Christmas Stories from History!
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Today’s Top Stories:

  1. Mattis resigns 0:19
  2. Withdrawing troops in Afghanistan 1:10
  3. Democrats faked Roy Moore-Russian link  1:45
  4. US indicts 2 Chinese for hacking   2:58
  5. Teething necklace warning  3:45

Today’s quote comes from Charles Dickens: 4:22

“Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childhood days, recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth, and transport the traveler back to his own fireside and quiet home!”

Have a very Merry Christmas. America Daily will be closed on Christmas Day.

Special Report:   By Matt & Laura at Take Me Home! 5:00

On this Christmas Eve, from our home to yours, we want to Wish you a very Happy and Merry Christmas.

Christmas joke?

What did the Gingerbread man find on his bed?

A Cookie Sheet

Matt:

There are so many stories to share at Christmas, and there have been plenty of amazing events nationally and around the world on Christmas Day. After all, it is a day of sharing and thanksgiving But some seem as if they were a cosmic Christmas Miracle such as :

  1. The Treaty of Ghent ends the War of 1812. Signed Dec. 24th 1814
  2. 1914: The World War I Christmas Truce was reached- that story has been making it rounds this year particularly. British and Germans.
  3. And in 1968: NASA created breakthroughs for space flight with Apollo 8 which was the first to orbit the moon and having the photos of moon and earth being shown 1st time EVER in orbit on Christmas Eve. The 3 astronauts who were on board that flying ship closed their televised accomplishment in space with the famous words: “Merry Christmas and God bless all of you, all of you on the good Earth”—and this became the most watched television event in history.

But the story we wanted to take home to your families tonight is so much more significant as a US historical event that happened on Christmas Day 242 years ago because if this didn’t happen well, the rest would have even been just an idea!

So, go get your cup of hot cocoa and sit by the fireplace or cuddle together under blankets and let’s begin

It seemed like a lost battle for freedom. It was late December in the year 1776, and cold had settled in the Northeast Colonies. It had also settled in many hearts of tired soldiers who missed their homes, their families, laughter, and warmth. They had been in the battle for many months with little food or warm clothing, medicine, or even proper shoes, and their hearts had grown weary.

To continue the fight seemed to be nothing more than pursuing a death wish. They were more than ready to return home in defeat. Even their commanding General was at a loss.

Then came a pamphlet with words so rich in dignity that they relit the lamps of public morale and, more importantly, rekindled the torch within the soldiers’ hearts, hearts that sought freedom.

What were the words in this pamphlet that could awaken soldiers from such despondency?

Perhaps it was this quote: “These are the times that try men’s souls; the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.”

And like an answer to a prayer, on that fateful night just days before Christmas, two more generals arrived with reinforcements and, therefore, hope.  Now the General, the Humble General who had stood with his men in despair, could plan one more attack before the end of the year.

This Humble General knew that the enemy was in their winter quarters across the icy river.  And he knew he and his men were outnumbered, and so he devised a very daring but risky plan: He and his entire army–all 2,400–would need to cross the icy cold river in the middle of the night and march towards the enemy before daybreak.

It was Christmas Night, Dec 25, 1776, when they started their journey. The Humble General led the way, and two boats followed, crossing the bitterly cold river, with the wind blowing ice that felt like swords slicing their faces. First one boat landed, and then the next. One almost didn’t make it, but the General needed them all.

Finally, at 3 a.m., hours after originally planned, the third boat arrived. Had it arrived too late? The Humble General wasn’t sure. They needed to reach the enemy before daybreak. Would they arrive in time? With no other choice, they marched on and on, taking four hours to arrive at the British camp.

The attack awakened the sleeping British so that the General’s army could surround the enemy and seize their weapons.

This victory was a turning point in the war. In the weeks to come, as the army won battle after battle, the militia eventually made America a free country, one we still celebrate today.

Who was this Humble General? It was George Washington, of course. He had stood with his men, his heart with our nation, and became our first president of the United States.

Let us not forget these deeds, as we celebrate in the warmth of our families.  Let us be eternally grateful for the sacrifice of Washington and his men who, on Christmas Day, gave their all to provide us freedom

This is now known as the famous “Crossing of the Delaware River”

Washington_Crossing_the_Delaware_by_Emanuel_Leutze

You can see a reenactment at Washington Crossing Historic Park in Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania.  this year is the 66th anniversary of the reenactment and every year it takes place on Christmas Day from Noon to 3:00 pm,

Legacy has it that some of these soldiers who were in the muck and danger that fateful night later became leaders of our great nation: a future President James Monroe, a Chief of Justice John Marshall, a Secretary of Treasury, Alexander Hamilton and President of the Continental Congress and Governor of Northwest Territory, Arthur St. Clair.

And who was that motivative writer? Thomas Paine who wrote the pamphlets called the “Common Sense.”

http://www.ushistory.org/paine/crisis/c-01.htm to see the entire pamphlet

So, leaders of our country didn’t just sit around watching others get a job done did they, Laura?

No, they didn’t it seems like they lead by example.

We should share our gratitude by putting care into action w/ our hearts and hands too in today’s America, to help keep our nation wonderful and safe for us all, especially our families.  And who knows maybe one of us will go down in history too!

Speaking of Families Matt- I hope all of you enjoyed this story that went down in History!!!! (Like Rudolph) and now it is time to enjoy the rest of our evening with our families right Matt?

It sure is Laura, until next time,

Merry Christmas!

 

 

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